Wood Turned Safety Razor Stand

There are numerous benefits from shaving with a safety razor and strikes a great balance between low cost, convenience, and high shave quality. They also make a very handsome addition to any bathroom. This project cost me $0.00 to complete! All the materials were sourced from either a scrap bin or the yard!

Note: Linked products are recommendations based on what I’ve found most effective and affordable. Affiliate information at page end.

Additional benefits of a safety razor include,

  • Easy technique to learn
  • Takes less time than a straight razor, while providing superior quality compared to the 3 – 15 bladed disposable razors.
  • Combined with a good shaving cream or soap, provides an extraordinarily close shave and better control resulting in a smooth even shave.
  • Likely one of the cheapest lifetime shaving solutions.

Here are products I’ve found affordable & high quality,


Safety Razor



Safety Razor Blades

But for this project we’re making a handsome wood turned stand for your safety razor!

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Supplies

For this project, you’ll need access to a wood lathe and turning tools (Take special note of safety preparations first if you do not have wood turning experience). You’ll need a piece of wood no less than 4 inches in diameter and 5-6 inches long. To acquire this wood, I recommend you go out into nature and find a nice solid chunk or visit your local wood shop. For this project, I used the stump to an old apple tree, and it worked out beautifully.

You’ll also need a piece of 3/4″ – 1″ thick x 4″ – 5″ long x 2″ – 3″ wide piece of wood. Again, I recommend visiting nature, but if you regularly work with wood, you’ll likely have a scrap piece just lying around. I’m using a small piece of walnut – this will make a very handsome color combination.

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Turning the Base

This is where things get fun, start the lathe at a low speed with a large gouge and begin to remove the outside edges of your piece and shape the hunk of wood into a conical shape. Once this is established, examine the specimen, taking note of any troublesome areas like cracks or rotted areas. Make the determination if a new piece of wood should be acquired.

This photo shows my piece after rough carving. At this phase, begin to lay out roughly where the bottom base of your stand will begin end, and where the top will end. Using the appropriate chisels, gradually remove the material the desired shape is achieved. My stand has a base diameter of 3.5″, a top diameter of 1/2″, and a height of 4″.

Once you’ve achieved the desired shape, drill a hole in the top end. We will secure a wooden rivet into this hole later. Now its finishing time, using progressively finer grits of sandpaper, sand the stand while still on the lathe.

Once sanding is complete, using a parting tool, cut the stand at the desired bottom point. While parting, I like to leave a convex surface at the bottom to prevent the stand from wobbling. Once the stand is released from the scrap material and the lathe, wipe the stand down with a lint free rag (or old T-Shirt) and finish with your preferred finish. I use Boiled Linseed Oil for a durable, non-toxic, and clear finish to really show off the wood grain.

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Cutting the Razor Holder

With the flat piece of wood, draw out using pencil the outline of the razor holder. This will roughly look like a person with no arms… This is just a rough estimate, we will finish this after it is cut. Using a scroll saw or jig saw, cut out the razor top.

Using a file, I prefer to use a “Four in the Hand File” for convenience, begin to carve away the corners of the razor holder to shape the wood into a smoother/more refined shape.

Using a drill, drill a hole in the center of the middle section. It is wise to use the same size bit used to cut the hole in the stand.

Here’s what my completed top resembled. I enjoyed creating the curves and aesthetics. I would avoid cutting away all of the material on the back end just yet. It may be valuable to have extra weight there once you set the razor on top to avoid tipping. You can always remove more material later…

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Final Assembly

One last peice you’ll need to make is a small rivet, as seen in the previous photo. Measure the diameter of the hole drilled in the stand portion. Using the scrap material from the stand, remount a small piece back into the lathe and turn a small rivet to the exact diameter measured in the stand’s top hole. Make the length sufficient to pass through your razor holder and penetrate into the stand. Finish the top of the rivet with a button head and sand smooth.

Ready to assembly! Place a small dab of wood glue in the stand hole, align the top and firmly stick the rivet in place to join all three bodies. Congratulations, you have your own wood turned safety razor stand!


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